Persuading The Public

Cicero said it, Dale Carnegie said it, and tens of thousands before and between said the same thing.

If you want to persuade, whether one person or a billion people, you must first get their attention, and secondly you must get them to agree with you.

When Shakespeare put words in Marc Antony’s mouth, standing over the body of Caesar, his first words were to r reassure the mob that he would not “praise Caesar but bury him.” Attention gained, Bill has Antony say “Brutus is an honorable man,” words that fit the mood of the mob very well. And, with confidence and attention gained, Shakespeare’s Marc Antony proceeds to do the neatest hatchet job imaginable on Brutus.

And does so while the mob, Brutus’ supporters almost to a man, agreed with him.

Now this headline: “Let’s Get This Straight: Trump Is No Reagan:” speaks to Trump opponents, but antagonizes the intended audience, Trump supporters.

For all the good such pieces do, you might as well howl at the moon.

So remember, praise, however much it makes your gorge rise, is a good way to start. Say nothing negative about the person, only their opinion. And Then bury them in fact. For example,

“Ms. Bertha Balz enthusiasm for her cause is commendable, but her facts are hopelessly wrong. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics 2014 Crime Victimization Survey, violent crime has declined by more than 70 percent since 1993. Those interested can read that official report here:

http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/cv14.pdf

Hopefully, Ms. Balz can be persuaded to report the correct numbers and information as quickly as possible.”

Remember, if the facts are on your side, argue the facts – and let the anti’s try to baffle the people with BS.

Stranger

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A collaborative effort, Extranos Alley is primarily concerned with providing up to date data on the relationships between privately woned firearms and crime, violence, and politics. The site is maintained by nine volunteers who have given up their identity that the work here may be considered without regard to the individual data. The contributors are a diverse group, ranging from a retired physicist to a board certified psychologist.

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One Response to Persuading The Public

  1. wuchang says:

    I was told by an old lawyer that if the facts are on your side “pound the facts”
    If the law is on your side ‘pound the law”
    If the facts are NOT on your side and if the law is NOT on your side “pound the table”

    To follow your lead, the lady is a most creative writer, unfortunately her sources are in error.

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